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 Pradeep Jeganathan was born and raised in Colombo, Sri Lanka, where he lives and works, engaged in a variety of intellectual, aesthetic and political projects. His research interests range from subaltern nationalism, to the perpetration of violence and its survival. He has published extensively on these subjects, and is, a co-author of the Encyclopedia Britannica's anchor article on Anthropology. His books, authored or edited include Living With Death (2007), At the Water's Edge (2004), Unmaking the Nation (1995|2009) and Subaltern Studies X1 (2001). He received his undergraduate education at MIT and Harvard, and his doctorate in Anthropology, with distinction, from the University of Chicago. He has held professorial appointments and fellowships at Chicago, Minnesota, The New School, Delhi University and the International Centre for Ethnic Studies.

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Out Now!

Unmaking the Nation: The Politics of Identity and History in Modern Sri Lanka (1995 | 2009).

Pradeep Jeganathan & Qadri Ismail (eds.)

Now in a 2nd Edition, with a new preface, and a comprehensive index.

"Stimulating... Excellent..." -- Journal of Asian Studies. 

"Will be of great value to all those concerned with... nationalism [and] violence..." -- Arjun Appadurai.

"...[F]orces us to think about Sri Lankan symbolic and social formations in an entirely novel fashion." -- Gananath Obeyesekere

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Assured and accomplished, Pradeep Jeganathan’s long awaited debut collection of short fiction is a spare, controlled meditation on the details of inhabitation: power and inequality, friendship and enmity, love and loss, violence and its memories. The seven interconnected stories span a near thirty years of his county’s recent past; each traces a delicately textured frame of troubling, telling beauty, weaving together, with almost incredible economy, not the often composed image of Sri Lanka — a paradise isle where ‘only man is vile’ — but a life world, live and remembered, to be lived in again.

 

Available in India from flipkart.com for Rs. 560, with free shipping

Available in Sri Lanka at Barefoot, Odel, Paradise Road, Sarasavi, SSA Suriya and other good book shops, for Rs. 500

 

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Reviews:

“A deft handling of Sri Lanka... light and unlaboured but deeply engrossing...”---Ceylon Daily News.

"In Pradeep Jeganathan's At the Water's Edge, you get to feel Sri Lanka's raw edge...it says much in a few words."---The Loney Planet Guide (Sri Lanka).

"In this finely sculpted collection of interwoven stories, he draws out the complexity of Sri Lankan lives in personal tales of disempowerment, disconnectedness, poverty, violence and civil war that has scarred this nation so deeply...Most importantly, these are stories that resist simple answers, and fast, cheap conclusions. The tight, sinewy prose rejects sentimentalism and any play towards melodrama. The stories are startling, precisely because they can so easily slip under the radar, and reveal their true arsenal only on later reflection. This is an assured and intelligent collection, and an important examination of contemporary issues and lives in this country."----The Nation on Sunday.

"Jeganathan has certainly mastered the art of the short story"---www.sangam.org

"...Anybody can have ideas--the difficulty is to express them [in] one glittering paragraph." -- Desijournal.com

"This is an excellent beginning by a new author and the possibility of an authentic new voice from Sri Lanka is an exciting one".---Asian Review of Books

Read excerpts from two stories: "Man from Jaffna" & "Sri Lanka"

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 For other reviews & essays see:

"At the Edge of Fiction, Nivedita Menon's fictional response, the literary critic Charles Sarvan commentary,  in the Ceylon Daily News, on the first story in the collection, "The Front Row" and the well known columnist K. S. Sivakumaran  comments on the fifth story, "The Train from Batticoloa." For Pradeep's thoughts on writing, take a look at Jehan Mendis's thoughtful interview with him in The Leisure Times